A Purim Treat That’s Fit for a Queen

Posted on February 12th, 2018
By Joan Nathan for Tablet Magazine  


Purim begins the evening of February 28

 

Every year at Purim we look forward to eating sweet triangular pastries called hamantaschen, but the first recipe I could find for cookies we might recognize as hamantaschen—filled with poppy seeds—appeared in Aunt Babette’s Cookbook of 1889. So what did American Jews eat on Purim before then? Purim fritters, also known as Queen Esther’s toast.

A recipe for Purim fritters appears in Jennie June’s Cookbook of 1866, and it was copied as Queen Esther’s toast in the National Cookery Book 10 years later, celebrating the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. It was made from the inside of a stale roll or loaf of bread, with the crust removed, soaked in eggs and milk; it was then fried in butter and served with cinnamon, a sugar syrup, honey, or “hundreds and thousands”—essentially, jimmies or sprinkles.

Continue reading.

Want more information on Purim? Check out Jvillage Network's Purim Guide. 

Forget Hot Cocoa — These Jewish Foods Will Keep You Warm

Posted on February 5th, 2018
The Nosher for myjewishlearning.com 


Get cozy with these delicious Jewish soups, carbs and sweets.


Yeah, yeah we know that hot chocolate is like the coziest thing to drink when it’s dreary and cold outside. But we prefer to snuggle up with babka, chicken soup and a whole bunch of other cozy Jewish dishes. Here are a few of our favorites to make your winter a little warmer.

Chicken Soup with Matzah Balls

Cheesy Garlic Pull-Apart Challah

Yemenite Vegetarian Soup

Continue reading.

Pages

Supporting B’nai Tzedek

Supporting B’nai Tzedek

B'nai Tzedek provides a vast array of programs designed to enlighten, stimulate and educate. We are challenged to explore our Judaism, history, customs and our relationship with the people of Israel. Your support allows us to maintain memberships and educational opportunities for those who might not otherwise afford it.

Read More